LogoPict

 

Home

Services

Service Area

Contact CFC

 

 


Invasive Plant Control


Invasive Plants are a major threat to the forests of Wisconsin. These species generally produce a large amount of seed that easily germinates and colonizes new areas. The plants then continue to spread while creating a environment that is not conducive to the growth of our native plants. The implications of this are devastating.

First, the invasive plants reduce plant diversity. Many plants that are native to Wisconsin can not compete with the invasive plants. Some invasive plants have been found to be alleopathic. In the simplest of terms, this means that the invasive plant produces chemicals that are excreted into the soil which inhibit the growth of other plants. Other native plants can not compete with the invasive plants for nutrient, water, and sunlight.

 

Second, the invasive plants may prevent the establishment and growth of native tree species. Native trees often need specific light, temperature, and soil conditions in order for their seeds to germinate and survive. Invasive plants can manipulate the environment of the forest floor so that native trees can not naturally regenerate.

Third, invasive plants have an impact on wildlife habitat. In general, a diverse plant environment across the landscape will improve wildlife diversity and population sustainability. However, some species of wildlife thrive within brush thickets created by certain invasive plants (such as buckthorn, honeysuckle, autumn olive). Song birds and rabbits, for example, utilize the cover provided by these species for nesting and escape habitat. The berries from the invasive shrubs are utilized for food. The seeds contained in the berries are then deposited in other locations visited by the animals, where the infestation of invasive plants then spreads.

Control of invasive plants is highly recommended by Central Forestry Consulting, LLC. However, due to the nature of invasive plants and the likely establishment of seed sources on nearby properties, control of invasive plants is a long-term and annual project. The accumulating expense of invasive plant control projects has led many professionals to recommend limited control efforts. For example, many recommend not worrying about invasive plants (other than limiting spread by artificial sources) until such time as the invasive plants will impact a forest management project. In this case, invasive plants would only be removed when attempting to regenerate a stand of native trees. This view point does not take into account that the diversity of species will be impacted nor does it recognize that the cost of treatment after leaving the invasive plants to dominate the understory of a forest is prohibitively expensive.

I recommend annual treatments of the invasive plants to eliminate the presence of the invasive plants from any given property and prevent re-establishment of any noticeable population. Generally, the use of herbicides will be required. Proper use of herbicides by a trained, licensed, and certified pesticide applicator will reduce any risk of negative impacts to the environment (such as ground or surface water contamination). I prefer to conduct the initial 1-3 years of application to eliminate the existing stocking of invasive plants. Then subsequent years can be followed up by Landowner treatments. I am available to train landowners on the proper use of specific herbicides. I can provide small quantities of recommended herbicides (in stock) so long as I am reimbursed for my cost of the chemicals. I can refer landowners to chemical dealers that are knowledgeable and fair.

For those landowners that have not found invasive plants on your property or are not sure if they have invasive plants on their property... be aware that a delay of only a few years can witness a small population exploding into a large population. Small populations can be easily controlled at limited cost. Be aware and diligent in the care of your property.

 

 

Home

Services

Service Area

Contact CFC