Home Services Service Area Contact CFC
 

Timber Stand Improvement

Timber stand improvements (TSI) are practices which improve your woodlands. These practices generally require a financial investment (however, cost-sharing is often available) to improve future returns (to meet your objectives and goals). The most common TSI practices are described below.

 
Site Preparation: This treatment is designed to prepare sites for either natural or artificial regeneration. This treatment can involve various chemical and/or mechanical methods depending on the method of regeneration and the current condition of the treatment area.
 


 

 

 

Crop Tree Release: releases selected "crop" trees from competition by removing neighboring trees/shrubs.The figure to the right shows a crop tree (center) with 3 sides of the crown "free to grow." Generally you want at least 2 sides of the crown "free to grow."

 

 

 

 

Timber stand improvements (TSI) are practices which improve your woodlands. These practices generally require a financial investment (however, cost-sharing is often available) to improve future returns (to meet your objectives and goals). The most common TSI practices are described below.

 

 


Site Preparation: This treatment is designed to prepare sites for either natural or artificial regeneration. This treatment can involve various chemical and/or mechanical methods depending on the method of regeneration and the current condition of the treatment area.

 


Crop Tree Release: releases selected "crop" trees from competition by removing neighboring trees/shrubs.The figure below shows a crop tree (center) with 3 sides of the crown "free to grow." Generally you want at least 2 sides of the crown "free to grow."

 

 

 

 

The figure to the left shows another way of viewing crop tree release.
In general crop trees can have spacings of anywhere between 15 and 35
feet apart.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pruning (Hardwoods): Lateral and/or corrective pruning is conducted to improve a tree's form and quality. Up to 150 "crop" trees per acre are selected for pruning. Generally, pruning is reserved for those tree species (example: Oaks and Walnuts) with the greatest potential to produce a financial return on this investment. Pruning of softwoods can be done but financial returns for pruning softwoods are often negative in Wisconsin.

 

 


 

 
       
Home Services Service Area Contact CFC